THE FIRST GAY PROTEST NOVEL

" . . . Something You Do in the Dark . . .

is a real novel, not  a political tract. It deals convincingly and powerfully with the persecution of a minority, but it tells the story of an individual, not a representative martyr. Its hero is torn between rebellion and cowardice, love and rage; he is never too good to be true.  I greatly admire Daniel Curzon for writing this book."

         --Christopher Isherwood, 1974

 

"Powerful and engrossing!"

--Walter Allen, author The English Novel  

 

                                           CLICK for MORE =                                                                                  

DANIEL CURZON
http://l-aleph.com/project/how-to-cyberbull-your-teacher-curzon/
HOW TO CYBERBULLY YOUR TEACHER

BOOKS                                  To purchase one of the few remaining hardback first edition copies of the 1971 DARK, go to the DONATE page for Ida Vanola Music on this website ($200)

Direct link to paperback sale on Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/dp/0930650166
 

"Almost three decades after I first read it, Something You Do in the Dark is still a powerful and provocative reading experience."

-- Jesse Monteaugudo, The Lost Library: Gay Fiction Rediscovered,  2010

original 1971 front cover of the G.P. Putnam edition
from XLIBRIS.com
CARTOONS for CAT LOWERS and CAT HATERS
READING at DOG-EARED BOOKS, 9/12/2016
HOW TO CYBERBULLY YOUR TEACHER (Wisehouse) 

"Hilarious"-- BLUE INK REVIEW

How to Cyberbully Your Teacher
We have seen in recent months the horrendous consequences of Internet culture— the brutality of trolling, cyber mobs, the advent of post-truth narratives, the exploitative exposure of private lives, etc. But the unleashing of our basest instincts in the crucible of anonymity has crawled deeper into our society, past this month’s viral agitprop or alt-right chatrooms. It has come to live in our very educational institutions, inculcating a malevolence and lack of empathy in our children— our very future. Author Daniel Curzon, in his brilliant and brutal book, How to Cyberbully Your Teacher, has struck the heart of the matter through the narrative form, taking the grim facts and abhorrent details of this reality and presenting its truth in a compelling, emotionally raw story that unveils the ultimate consequences of cyberbullying on a private, personal, and human level. Mr. Curzon’s skills as a novelist (here, in the non-fiction genre) are readily apparent; his command of character and dialogue instantly sweeps the reader into this perverse reality, establishing the disquieting and deeply unnerving cultural norms of the contemporary educational institution from the very outset. The author’s ability to approach both the social ramifications of cyberbullying, as well as the individual psychological (and professional) fallout of anonymous attacks, speaks to his passionate investment in the subject matter which, through his evocative prose and dramatic prowess, instills a passionate investment in the reader herself. This is a profound and essential conversation that needs to be had today, and Mr. Curzon has delivered us a first step, in this forceful work, towards facing the problem head-on.
—Charles Asher Phi Beta Kappa Reviews
" . . . his brilliant and brutal book . . . " Phi Beta Kappa Reviews
How to Cyberbully Your Teacher
We have seen in recent months the horrendous consequences of Internet culture— the brutality of trolling, cyber mobs, the advent of post-truth narratives, the exploitative exposure of private lives, etc. But the unleashing of our basest instincts in the crucible of anonymity has crawled deeper into our society, past this month’s viral agitprop or alt-right chatrooms. It has come to live in our very educational institutions, inculcating a malevolence and lack of empathy in our children— our very future. Author Daniel Curzon, in his brilliant and brutal book, How to Cyberbully Your Teacher, has struck the heart of the matter through the narrative form, taking the grim facts and abhorrent details of this reality and presenting its truth in a compelling, emotionally raw story that unveils the ultimate consequences of cyberbullying on a private, personal, and human level. Mr. Curzon’s skills as a novelist (here, in the non-fiction genre) are readily apparent; his command of character and dialogue instantly sweeps the reader into this perverse reality, establishing the disquieting and deeply unnerving cultural norms of the contemporary educational institution from the very outset. The author’s ability to approach both the social ramifications of cyberbullying, as well as the individual psychological (and professional) fallout of anonymous attacks, speaks to his passionate investment in the subject matter which, through his evocative prose and dramatic prowess, instills a passionate investment in the reader herself. This is a profound and essential conversation that needs to be had today, and Mr. Curzon has delivered us a first step, in this forceful work, towards facing the problem head-on.
—Charles Asher Phi Beta Kappa Reviews

"Monumentally original" -- Phi Beta Kappa Reviews
a novel in e-mails about gays having kids, with the usual problems -- plus some special ones
"Buy this book because it will entertain you." --Louie Crew
What if someone tried to assassinate the assassin of a gay rights leader?
CRITICAL RAVES
order from IGNA BOOKS DIRECTLY
Sent by his heavenly father, Zeus, Superfag sets off to rid the Earth of homophobia. Good luck, kid!
http://www.xtranormal.com/watch/11227759
an openly gay teacher encounters outer and inner demons in Fresno

from review by Ian Young in Torso magazine:

"Angry, bitter, and dangerous,

with chips on both shoulders,

Daniel Curzon is also ferociously honest and very funny."

 

"He has been everywhere, he has met everyone, and now that he has your attention, he is going to let you know exactly what he has been thinking about them all these years. The result is a blunt, hilarious, page-turning ride that is, to use the cliche, impossible

to put down."

        -- Philip Clark, Lambda Literary Review

the lowdown on the literati of our time
review of DROPPING NAMES by Philip Clark
The MISADVENTURES of TIM McPICK, A QUEER COMEDY
some politically impolite tales
�Something You Do in the Dark  . . . is a real novel, not a political tract. It deals
convincingly and

 

“Something You Do in the Dark  . . . is a real novel, not a political tract. It deals

convincingly and powerfully with the persecution of a minority, but it tells the story of an individual, not a representative martyr. Its hero is torn between rebellion and cowardice, love and rage; he is never too good to be true. I greatly admire Daniel Curzon for writing this book.”     – Christopher Isherwood, 1974

powerfully with the persecution of a minority, but it tells the story of an ind

REVIEWS of SOMETHING YOU DO IN THE DARK by DANIEL CURZON,

over forty years (the first gay protest novel):

 

�Engrossing, powerful, and disturbing.�

              � Joyce Carol Oates (front cover blurb, 1971 Putnam edition)

 

�Something You Do in the Dark  . . . is a real novel, not a political tract. It deals

convincingly and powerfully with the persecution of a minority, but it tells the story of an individual, not a representative martyr. Its hero is torn between rebellion and cowardice, love and rage; he is never too good to be true. I greatly admire Daniel Curzon for writing this book.�     � Christopher Isherwood, 1974

 

�Powerful and engrossing!�       � Walter Allen, author of The English Novel

 

�I think Dark is truly �powerful and engrossing.�� � Michael Sarotte, author of Like a Lover, Like a Brother

 

�I read the book when I was young. It was a gift to all of us.� � David Mixner, Author/Activist

 

�Brutally frank and unflinchingly honest, Something You Do in the Dark is not meant to shock. Neither is a cry for sympathy. It is, instead, a scathing indictment of society and the terrible methods it uses to haunt and harass some of its members.� � from original press release from G. P. Putnam, 1971 hard back edition.

 

�At last, a true-to-life portrait of a gutsy gay male: fast-moving, up-to-date, healthy and courageous. We rooted for him from cover to cover, and we�ll remember him for a long time.� � Lige & Jack, Editors, Gay (newspaper), 1971 (back cover of original Putnam edition)

 

�. . . Curzon�s novel surpasses its predecessors in harsh, beautiful honesty, in liberated grasp of the subtle varieties of homosexual character, in anguished, unsentimental protest and it its spirit of nowness.�   � Jim Kepner, The Advocate, 1971 (back cover blurb for original Putnam edition)

 

�Almost three decades after I first read it, Something You Do in the Dark is still a powerful and provocative reading experience.� � Jesse Monteagudo, The Lost Library: Gay Fiction Rediscovered, 2010

 

 

�Something You Do in the Dark  . . . is a real novel, not a political tract. It deals

convincingly and powerfully with the persecution of a minority, but it tells the story of an individual, not a representative martyr. Its hero is torn between rebellion and cowardice, love and rage; he is never too good to be true. I greatly admire Daniel Curzon for writing this book.�     � Christopher Isherwood, 1974

�SOMETHING YOU DO IN THE DARK certainly deserves a wide readership and should be on every list of classic novels with gay characters-- whatever that means-- and should be considered with CITY OF NIGHT, GIOVANNI'S ROOM and THE CITY AND THE PILLAR.� � H.F. Corbin (Amazon Top 500 Reviewer), 2010

 

. . . This is an important novel especially for the younger gay generation so they can know that the rights that we have today were brought about at the pains of another generation. It is a political statement against the powers that were and we see just how vulnerable we were. The same kind of vice squad action is still here and it seems that it will always will be. Everything about his book is still relevant today but not as overt as it was the 1970�s.

. . . Curzon uses his novel to show us how the gay population was once treated and we owe him a great deal for that. He has given us unforgettable characters who lived at a time when it was not wise for someone to proclaim his sexuality. Everyone should read this and then use what was read to help create a better and more accepting world.

   � Amos Lassen,  Blog at Wordpress, Reviews by Amos Lassen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

iv

REVIEWS of SOMETHING YOU DO IN THE DARK by DANIEL CURZON,

over forty years (the first gay protest novel):

 

�Engrossing, powerful, and disturbing.�

              � Joyce Carol Oates (front cover blurb, 1971 Putnam edition)

 

�Something You Do in the Dark  . . . is a real novel, not a political tract. It deals

convincingly and powerfully with the persecution of a minority, but it tells the story of an individual, not a representative martyr. Its hero is torn between rebellion and cowardice, love and rage; he is never too good to be true. I greatly admire Daniel Curzon for writing this book.�     � Christopher Isherwood, 1974

 

�Powerful and engrossing!�       � Walter Allen, author of The English Novel

 

�I think Dark is truly �powerful and engrossing.�� � Michael Sarotte, author of Like a Lover, Like a Brother

 

�I read the book when I was young. It was a gift to all of us.� � David Mixner, Author/Activist

 

�Brutally frank and unflinchingly honest, Something You Do in the Dark is not meant to shock. Neither is a cry for sympathy. It is, instead, a scathing indictment of society and the terrible methods it uses to haunt and harass some of its members.� � from original press release from G. P. Putnam, 1971 hard back edition.

 

�At last, a true-to-life portrait of a gutsy gay male: fast-moving, up-to-date, healthy and courageous. We rooted for him from cover to cover, and we�ll remember him for a long time.� � Lige & Jack, Editors, Gay (newspaper), 1971 (back cover of original Putnam edition)

 

�. . . Curzon�s novel surpasses its predecessors in harsh, beautiful honesty, in liberated grasp of the subtle varieties of homosexual character, in anguished, unsentimental protest and it its spirit of nowness.�   � Jim Kepner, The Advocate, 1971 (back cover blurb for original Putnam edition)

 

�Almost three decades after I first read it, Something You Do in the Dark is still a powerful and provocative reading experience.� � Jesse Monteagudo, The Lost Library: Gay Fiction Rediscovered, 2010

 

�SOMETHING YOU DO IN THE DARK certainly deserves a wide readership and should be on every list of classic novels with gay characters-- whatever that means-- and should be considered with CITY OF NIGHT, GIOVANNI'S ROOM and THE CITY AND THE PILLAR.� � H.F. Corbin (Amazon Top 500 Reviewer), 2010

 

. . . This is an important novel especially for the younger gay generation so they can know that the rights that we have today were brought about at the pains of another generation. It is a political statement against the powers that were and we see just how vulnerable we were. The same kind of vice squad action is still here and it seems that it will always will be. Everything about his book is still relevant today but not as overt as it was the 1970�s.

. . . Curzon uses his novel to show us how the gay population was once treated and we owe him a great deal for that. He has given us unforgettable characters who lived at a time when it was not wise for someone to proclaim his sexuality. Everyone should read this and then use what was read to help create a better and more accepting world.

   � Amos Lassen,  Blog at Wordpress, Reviews by Amos Lassen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

idual, not a r �Something You Do in the Dark  . . . is a real novel, not a political tract. It deals
convincingly and powerfully with the persecution of a minority, but it tells the story of an individual, not a representative martyr. Its hero is torn between rebellion and cowardice, love and rage; he is never too good to be true. I greatly admire Daniel Curzon for writing this book.�     � Christopher Isherwood, 1974
epresentative martyr. Its hero is torn between rebellion and cowardice, love and rage; he is never too good to be true. I greatly admire Daniel Curzon for writing this book.�     � Christopher Isherwood, 1974